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of the world are on the gaza strip for eight days. hamas rained rockets down on israel. the mullas shipped rockets to the sudan, sent them up into egypt before smuggling them in tunnels. israel responded by doing the only thing a responsible nation could do, it defended itself. now the united states needs to show there are consequences for attacking this sovereign nation, consequences for hamas and iran as well. we should have stricter enforcement of sanctions against iran. iran and hamas both need to be held accountable for these attacks. israel are the moral right and legal duty to defend itself from the barbarians, hamas. there is a cease-fire but only until hamas obtains more iranian missiles. hamas is the puppet and iran is the police departmentetteeer. the iranian regime need to go. the iranian people need to do away with the little guy in the desert, ahmadinejad. and that's the way it is. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the house will be in order. further requests for nute speeches? are there further requests for one-minute speeches? the gent
and what i think about that. >> yes. >> any time israel is involved in a story, did becomes excruciatingly -- id becomes excruciatingly difficult to cover, because there is a sense of identity in this country with israelis, and many reporters, old friends and colleagues of mine used to be criticized for taking an anti- israeli point of view. he spent many years living in the arab world and had a sympathetic. of view to arabs. i think what is happening in gaza right now meets in the definition of tragedy. the israelis cannot be expected to stand by while their cities are rocketed. on the other hand, the idea that the israeli defense forces are equally professional, the number of casualties on the palestinian side are going to be much greater. they are leaving an impression there is something unfair. this is the time you need correspondents who have spent years in the region, because by and large, you ask what i think of the coverage. i think it is surface. it focuses on the casualties. you do not know what the possibilities may be for agreement on the sides. i think that is one thing we hav
in israel today. that has been pushed to 3:30 eastern. we will take you there once it gets under way. >> james on our 65 and over line. good afternoon, sir. caller: i'm 85-year-old and i was living good up until the last four years off of my retirement. but in the last four years the cost of living has gone up so much that i can't make it. i have to get out and get odd jobs to buy groceries. and this -- the first of this year i got a 1.7 increase in social security and cost of living went up 30% this year. host: what is the biggest thing that cost of living increase affects for you? caller: just about everything i buy. my grashries and gasoline so i go to a doctor and stores host: how old did you say you were? caller: 85. host: so you've been retired for some time. caller: yes. host: let's to -- go to susan in washington. caller: the economy has affected most of us for a number of years as far as i can tell. i've tried to save money to invest it and when i tried to invest it i lost most of what i put in because of what happened at the twin towers and i don't know that the economy is
what scenarios you would put on the table? and are you concerned about israel? >> israel's interesting because israel has a lot at stake but israel is also an independent decisionmaker. and they have their own interests in this and they have made it clear that they are not prepared to accept without some kind of military action iran with a clear path to nuclear weapon. so in some sense it will force us to pay attention to this issue, which we should. there are a lot of options. i think what we need to think about are not options but scenarios. one scenario would be for the administration to reengage with the iranians diplomatically, with the other countries involved, so-called p-5, 5 permanent members of the security council plus germany to make a fairly robust offer to the iranians of the kinds of things available to the iranian people of the regimes to give up this nuclear program and test them and to see if there is a diplomatic outcome. it's acceptable. if there isn't i think the process will be important in order for the administration to set up whatever options might follow the f
this panel is syria. but what is happening in israel as we gather here this week? these are the questions of our time. these are the challenges of our generation and. that, i think, is one of the great benefits of opportunities like halifax, to have a very in- depth discussion on how we got as a community -- a community of democracies, a community of countries that care, are compassionate, and are able to do something to stop the slaughter of innocent civilians. >> there were many who say we need to have more young emerging democracies that need to be stepping up to the plate and taking on more of your responsibilities. indonesia, india, brazil, turkey, south africa, but at the same time, we also hear the statements made that as they get involved and should step up to the plate in helping to nurture democracy come to protest human rights, but that they also have to make sure there roadhouses in order. what are your thoughts on that? >> certainly, more nations now have their role to play. definitely, in our case, we're trying to play a role based on our experience. as you might know, our c
the war in syria, the conflict between israel and the palestinians, and the destabilizing threat from iran and every time and overtime we also must address the religious, economic and cultural differences that create tension and that are exploited by extremists. still, as our country emerges from a decade of large-scale conflict and confronts new fiscal constraints at home, i, frankly, worry that our political system will prevent us from making the investments in diplomacy and development that we need to ensure we protect america's interests in these volatile regions of the world. these investments unfortunately lack a constituency in the congress at a time of great fiscal pressure. indeed, we face the process of budget sequestration that would be devastating to national security, not just because what have it does to our national defense, but also for what it does to these programs that support diplomacy and enhance our quality of life. our men and women in uniform know too well what sacrifice is all about for the sake of our nation. for more than a decade after we were attacked on septem
think that's across the board , his relationship with israel, his relationship with the muslim world. host: this is a "financial times" editorial today. rethink on drones after petraeus exit. general petraeus has been the master mind behind using deprones to go after al qaeda in the horn of africa, etc. what has been the world reaction to these -- this type of mill tear strategy. guest: the administration has doubled down on thes you of drones. there are hundreds more than there ever were in the bush administration. there's clear security rationale for some of them. there are certainly issues. the administration's execity -- executive privilege in making these decisions. i don't think petraeus was the only person who has been the master mind. this has been -- there are many figures in the administration that feel strongly about this. i don't see the policy changing. but there is certainly a feeling in pakistan, especially, in the horn of africa and other places new york yemen, it was -- i believe it was the day of -- the day after, the morning after the evening of obama's victory, th
. >> are you concerned about is real? >> interesting, israel has a lot at stake, but they are also an independent decision maker. they have their own interest in this and have made it clear that they are not prepared to except without some of the military action iran with a clear path to a nuclear weapon. one scenario would be for the illustration to try to engage with the iranians diplomatically. with the other countries involved in the so called p five. offering a robust disclosure to the iranians if there regime will give up its nuclear program. to test them, to see if there is a diplomatic outcome that is accessible. if there is not, i think that that process will be important for the administration to set up options following the failure,, or the iranian regime. i would be very much on the lower end of military options. as part of the scenario of giving them over to give up weapons, it is that kind of scenario development i would try, which is the direction we're heading in at this point. dennis is going to speak to you later this morning, he is terrific on this subject and yo
not be jeopardized for our one true ally in the middle east, the state of israel. this included showing some support for what is become widely dome of the iron rocket defense system. but our focus in the middle east has certainly not stopped there. we've gone to great lengths in this congress to zero in on what i believe is the greatest threat we have to our own national security, and that is a nuclear armed iran. i've been pleased to team with representative ted deutch and senator kirk on a number of bills to stem this -- and confront this threat. our actions have ranged from strengthening sanctions on iran's energy sector to promoting human rights and democracy inside iran and much more. in fact, one of our most important accomplishments in this congress will have been a strong sanctions package which passed both houses this summer and which included these provisions that we authored. finally, i'd like to highlight the ongoing work to pass a bipartisan budget agreement. this is an initiative that i have been proud to advance, starting with the bipartisan letter urging the supercommittee to go big,
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9